Elvis VINYL in the uk 1956 - 2002:
a brief timeline of major changes
Show More

1956 - March

The first ever Elvis record was released in the United Kingdom. It came in two formats:  A 7" 45rpm single: (7M 385) or a 10" 78 rpm single: (POP 182)

It was released by   'His Master's Voice' (HMV) record label.

The 45 rpm single came in a  pale yellow company sleeve with red printing. The HMV logo (Nipper) was located top centre. The record label, plum in colour, used gold lettering and had a 'knockout' type centre.

The 78 rpm single was housed in a black and white company sleeve with black printing. The HMV logo was  located slightly to the left at the bottom. The rear of the sleeve promoted other HMV artists. The record label was a light blue colour with white lettering.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Variation 2 - Side 1
Variation 2 - Side 2

1956 - October

Elvis' debut album titled "Rock 'n' Roll" (HMV CLP 1093) was released by HMV in the United Kingdom. It came as a 12" 33 rpm long play (LP) record.

The album's front cover was the same as the US version and used a black and white action shot of Elvis from 1955. It had the artist's first name in pink lettering along the left, with his surname in green across the bottom. The HMV logo was located top right. 

 

The record label, plum in colour, used gold lettering and had the HMV logo across the top centre.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More

1957 - February

HMV released the first Elvis '(EP) extended play:  (HMV 7EG 8199). This was also the soundtrack to his first motion picture 'Love Me Tender'.  An extended play record was also 7" in size and played at 45 rpm.

The picture sleeve had a  front cover that was completely different to the US version. They used a black and white action shot of Elvis singing "We're Gonna Move" from the movie. It had the album title with the artist's  name underneath in black lettering across the bottom. The HMV logo was located top right. 

 

The 'knockout' turquoise record label    used silver lettering and had the HMV logo located middle  right of centre.

VAriation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Show More

1957 - June?

HMV released a new design and layout for their singles.  The front cover for both the 78 and 45 sleeves were very similar. Red and white in colour with 'His Master's Voice' across the top. The slogan underneath read: 'For The Tops in Pops'  The HMV logo was located bottom centre. The main design  consisted of a group of young people dancing to rock 'n' roll music.

The rear of the 78 sleeve promoted other HMV artists.

Show More

1957 - July

RCA Victor begin to issue Elvis product  in Britain. The first release   is the new single from his second movie titled 'Loving You'. The tracks chosen are 'Teddy Bear'/'Loving You' (RCA 1013). As before it's released on both 45 rpm and 78 rpm formats.

The 45 rpm single was housed in a red and white sleeve with the RCA logo located top left. The revolution speed was located bottom right.

The 78 rpm records were housed in brown plain paper sleeves with no reference to the artist   or record label.

The record label of both were   black in colour and used the large RCA  'lightning bolt' logo. The 45 rpm single had a 'triangular' centre while the 78 had a solid centre.

Around the same time RCA also released their first Elvis extended play   record titled 'Peace in the Valley' (RCX 101).  It came in a picture sleeve that was identical to the US release and used   a  beautiful publicity shot of Elvis from 'Love Me Tender'.

The record label followed the same design as the UK RCA 45 rpm single and also had a 'triangular' centre. 

Note: At this time, HMV in Britain were still releasing Presley product as well so it was possible to buy Elvis records on two different labels.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Show More
Variation 2 - Side 1
Variation 2 - Side 2
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1957 - August

RCA, having already issued their first Elvis single and EP, released their first Presley LP which was   the soundtrack to his second movie of the same name 'Loving You' (RC 24001).

The front cover had a publicity shot from the movie and   was the exact same as the american version but the albums were completely different. The US release  was a standard  12" LP containing fourteen tracks. The UK version was slightly unique 10 inches in size. The   album had a total of eight tracks.

The record label again was black in colour using the same large 'RCA' logo.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1957 - October

HMV released their latest Elvis single: 'Trying To Get To You'/'Lawdy, Miss Clawdy' (POP 408). It was pressed using silver lettering instead of gold as before. They also re-pressed older singles using the silver print. The 78 rpm single stayed the same.

Note: In September 1958 the HMV Elvis catalogue was deleted. Presley records  from this point on were  solely released by RCA.

Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1960 - April

RCA released the first single since Elvis was discharged from the US army. 'Stuck On You'/'Fame and Fortune' (RCA 1187). The 45 rpm sleeve was now red and brown with boxes that could be used to write in catalogue numbers. The single's centre type had now   changed from 'triangular' to 'knockout'. All re-pressings of the older 50's singles from this point on would also have 'knockout' centres.

The 78 rpm design was pretty much the same as before.

1960 - June

RCA released the follow up to   'Elvis' Golden Records'. In the US, the album   was called '50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong, Elvis' Golden Records Vol. 2'. In the UK it was simply 'Elvis' Golden Records, Vol. 2'. The sleeve  had a small modification to the RCA logo. All previous RCA albums up until now had used the same style of logo: Large RCA 'lightning' bolt with the catalogue number and record speed to the right. Underneath it stated: 'A New Orthophonic High Fidelity Recording'.  The new look had a smaller RCA logo boxed with the words:  'A New Orthophonic Recording'

Show More

1960 - July

RCA released their first LP since Elvis was discharged from the US army. 'Elvis Is Back!' (RD 27171). The album was also  issued in stereo (SF 5060).   Both sleeves were identical. G   ate-fold   with the inner sleeve   contained bonus photos of Elvis in the army. The front cover had a publicity shot from early 1960, the rear sleeve used a shot from march 1958. The record labels still use the large RCA logo, but the stereo labels have the words: 'Living Stereo' either side of the logo.

Note: Around this time RCA issued their last ever Elvis 78 rpm record: 'A Mess of Blues'/'The Girl of My Best Friend' (RCA 1194). Elvis singles from now on were   only pressed as a 7" 45 rpm.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1960 - November

Elvis' latest EP: 'Such A Night' (RCX 190) had the same logo changes to the sleeve as were made to the albums. The front cover was exactly the same as the one used for the LP: 'Elvis is Back!'. The centre type of the record also changed from 'triangular' to 'knockout'.

All re-pressings of the older 50's EPs from this point on would also have 'knockout' centres.

1961 - January

RCA released Elvis' latest single 'Are You Lonesome Tonight?'/'I Gotta Know' (RCA 1216) in January 1961. The red and brown  company sleeve stayed pretty much the same in layout design but the colour had  now changed to red and white.

Show More
Show More

1962- June

The release of the soundtrack EP 'Follow That Dream' (RCX 211) saw another change to the RCA logo. The sleeve now read: 'RCA VICTOR' and to the right had a smaller RCA 'lightning' logo.  The record was still pressed using the same layout as before.

Show More

1962 - December

RCA released 'Rock 'n' Roll No. 2' which was  originally released in mono by HMV back in April 1957. This LP  was issued in   both mono (RD 7528) and electronic stereo (SF 7528). The front cover was completely different to the HMV version. It used an old publicity shot from 'Love Me Tender' and the  RCA logo changed once again. It now showed 'RCA Victor'. First issues of the stereo sleeve had  'Stereo - electronically processed' under the logo. This  was removed on later copies.

The record label design  was also updated and stated the 'RCA VICTOR' change  located on top of a smaller 'silver dot' lightning  logo.

Re-issues of older albums were pressed using this label.

Show More
Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1963 - February

Elvis' latest single 'One Broken Heart For Sale'/'They Remind Me Too Much Of You' (RCA 1337) taken from his latest movie: 'It Happened At The World's Fair' was the first to use the new label. The previous single 'Return To Sender' /'Where Do You Come From' (RCA 1320)  released in November 1962 had used both the new and older labels. This was probably done to use up old stock.  Older singles were re-pressed using this new label.

Show More

1962 - December

The first EP to be pressed only using   the new 'RCA VICTOR' label was  'Love in Las Vegas' (RCX  7141) released in April 1964. The label  though was first seen on  the previous  EP: 'Kid Galahad' (RCX 7106). This was also pressed using the older labels again to use up old stock.

Older EP's were re-issued using the new label.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Variation 4 - Side 1
Variation 4 - Side 2

1964- April

The release of the album 'Elvis' Golden Records, Vol. 3' (RCA RD/SF 7630) saw yet another modification to RCA's logo. This time, the small 'silver dot' was changed in colour to red. This alteration did not affect singles or EP's.

Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1969- February

Note: In June 1967 the last Elvis EP was released. It was the soundtrack to the movie  'Easy Come, Easy Go' (RCX 7187)

In February 1969, RCA issued Elvis' latest single 'If I Can Dream'/'Memories' (RCA 1795). The sleeve was  totally changed in both colour and design. The red and white was replaced on both sides by using a green top half with an new orange 'RCA' logo and a white bottom half with the same logo in green. On the rear of the sleeve, the words 'Made in England' ran down both sides.

The black label was now changed to orange with a computer style 'RCA' logo running down the left of the spindle hole. The 'knockout' centre type remained. 1969-70 first variations   using   this label stated 'MANUFACTURED BY RCA LTD'. Later releases or re-issues stated 'MANUFACTURED BY RCA LIMITED'

Older singles and EP's were re-pressed using this label. 

Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1969- April

The  soundtrack album to Elvis' hit TV Special was released in mono only using the new style sleeve and record label. 'Elvis' (RD 8011) had a front cover shot of Elvis singing the shows closing number:  'If I Can Dream'. The new computer style 'RCA' logo located top left, with the word 'VICTOR' in the same typeface top right.

The record label colour was now changed to orange and matched the same layout as the 'If I Can Dream'single, but the labels size was different. This label was known as 'small orange' because it was smaller than the standard size used up until now.

This was the only 'new' album issued with this label.  The 'small orange' label was used mostly on re-pressings of older albums.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More

1969- June

In the United States,   as part of the 1968 NBC TV Special, one of the shows sponsors 'Singer' released an album 'Elvis sings Flaming Star'. Later, RCA in the UK released an identical album (INTS 1012) on their new 'INTERNATIONAL (camden)' budget label. The front cover used a shot from the movie 'Stay Way, Joe', while the rear cover advertised the four albums in the 'Golden Records' series plus Elvis' two gospel albums.

The record label had a lime green colour with the now standard RCA logo running down the left hand side. The words 'INTERNATIONAL (camden) ran across the middle right.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More

1969- August

The album 'From Elvis in Memphis' (RD/SF 8029) was the last album to be release in both mono and stereo. All new albums were released in stereo only. The sleeves were identical, and the front cover had a great shot of Elvis from his TV Special in 1968 even though the content on this album had nothing to do with it. The photo on the rear was a publicity still from the movie 'Viva Las Vegas'.

The 'small orange' label had now already been replaced for this album by the standard sized 'large orange' version.

Some older albums were re-pressed using this label.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Show More
Show More
Variation 3 - Side 1
Variation 3 - Side 2
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1978- May

The  'orange label' used for single and album releases  had been the norm for the last nine years.  The release of the album 'Elvis - The '56 Sessions Vol. 1' saw the introduction of a new blue label with  a scripted 'elvis' logo across the top.

The single 'Old Shep'/'Paralysed' taken from this album also used the same label.

Some older albums were re-pressed using this label.

Show More
Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 1 - Side 2

1979- April

The latest LP release from the Camden label saw the 'RCA' logo completely omitted from the sleeve and record label.

Some previous   Camden albums were re-released using the same changes to both the sleeve and record.

2694 - Variation 4 - Side 1
2694 - Variation 4 - Side 2
Variation 7 - Side 1
Variation 7 - Side 2

1980- Late

A new label was introduced by RCA around this time. It was known as 'New Black' and kept the same logo type that had been used up until now. This label was primarily used for re-pressings of previous  singles.  It would be used later on re-pressings of older albums.

The single 'Green, Green Grass of Home'/'Release Me'/'Solitaire' released in May 1984 was the first 'new' release that used the 'New Black' label.

1980- August

On the third anniversary of  Elvis' death, RCA  re-introduced the 'International' (INTS) catalogue. Like before it was  a budget label, but this time full-price albums were re-released at a reduced price. There was a slight colour change too. The previous International albums were pressed using a lime colour, the new version used a light green label. Some new albums were also released using this label. 

 

In some cases, older surplus 'SF' stereo sleeves had either an 'INTS''foldover'or standard sticker(s)   applied over the old 'SF' catalogue number   to change them to the International catalogue. These sleeves would contain various  older  labels: orange, elvis blue, or new black.

Variation 1 - Side 1
Variation 2 - Side 1
Show More
Show More
Variation 2 - Side 1
Variation 2 - Side 2

1983 - October

The UK catalogue saw records now being manufactured in Germany instead of Britain. These albums were imported to the UK and  seemed to be   better quality than the previous 'International' ones. As before some of these  German albums had  an 'INTS' sticker applied to the front and rear to change it to the international catalogue.

Between 1983 and 1985, most of Elvis' original albums were re-released using the German 'NL' catalogue.

1985 - August

In 1983, RCA bought part of the 'Arista' label that was owned by the 'Bertelsmann  Group'. Even though this meant they were  partners of some sort, they still operated as separate companies.

In 1985, they formed  a new company called 'RCA/Ariola'.  

1986 - January 

RCA are taken over by  General Electric, who later in December, sold the music section of RCA to  Bertelsmann .  

1987  - January 

Bertelsmann take complete control of RCA  and incorporate it into  'Bertelsmann Music Group' (BMG)

The Elvis Presley UK Vinyl Database

Elvis Presley™ is a trademark of The Estate of Elvis Presley, LLC